Home » Curriculum Development Grants

IFYC is pleased to offer $1,000 grants to faculty at colleges and universities in the U.S. to fund the development of undergraduate courses that engage interfaith themes and pedagogies. Funded by the Mellon foundation, these grants are intended to support scholars across a variety of disciplines interested in engaging the emerging field of interfaith studies in creative and rigorous ways.

Grants will be awarded for curricular development and/or revision work to be conducted during the summer of 2019. Applications are due on March 29, 2019 and grant implementation will take place from May 1, 2019 – August 30, 2019.

Before applying, please review the grant details, including terms and requirements, in the Request for Proposals below. Any questions about the grants or the application process are welcome and should be addressed to Carolyn Roncolato, Director of Academic Initiatives, at carolyn@ifyc.org or 312.573.8826.

Examples of Previous Grantees


Food & Religion in Practice: Rituals, Dietary Laws, and Movements for Justice

- Matt Hoffman / Warren Wilson read more read less
Matt Hoffman / Warren Wilson

Matt Hoffman at Warren Wilson received a grant to develop a first-year seminar entitled Food & Religion in Practice: Rituals, Dietary Laws, and Movements for Justice. Beginning with the premise that food is a central human experience, Dr. Hoffman invites students to reflect on how people use food to make sense of themselves and the world around them.  The class explores the role of food in cultural and religious traditions; including sacred meals, dietary laws, and issues of food justice.


The Interfaith Movement

- Matthew Sayers, Shelley Steiner, and Jeff Robbins / Lebanon Valley College read more read less
Matthew Sayers, Shelley Steiner, and Jeff Robbins / Lebanon Valley College

At Lebanon Valley College, Matthew Sayers, Shelley Steiner and Jeff Robbins received a grant to develop a course entitled The Interfaith Movement. Tracing the history of interfaith movements in the United States, the course introduces students to religious literacy, the development of religious pluralism in the United States, the concept of interfaith leadership, the rise of interfaith studies as an academic discipline, and various civic interfaith movements.


Introduction to World Religions

- Maureen Walsh and SJ Crasnow / Rockhurst University read more read less
Maureen Walsh and SJ Crasnow / Rockhurst University

With grant funding, Maureen Walsh and SJ Crasnow at Rockhurst University revised their Introduction to World Religions course to include interfaith themes and employ interfaith methodology. The revised course uses real world case studies to teach religious literacy, tools for understanding historical context, and the role of religion on the global stage.


On the Border: Immigration Justice in Interfaith Perspective

- Sarah Williams / Miami University read more read less
Sarah Williams / Miami University

With her grant, Sarah Williams of Miami University, created a course entitled On the Border: Immigration Justice in Interfaith Perspective. Using interfaith activism as a lens to study U.S. immigration, students evaluate immigration arguments in light of personal, interpersonal, local, and national borders. The course uses first-person narratives, faith-based and secular writings, and student’s own experience to explore immigration.